Do Magnetic bracelets work? Depends who you ask!

Should we ask the question do the magnetic bracelets really work or should we go for broke and ask how do magnetic bracelets work? It’s harder than you think. Like a chicken and egg question. Do we presume that they work and look for the mechanism? Or do we start off assuming nothing, like orthodox scientists. It was after all George Francis Gillette who said “there is no ox so dumb as the orthodox.

But was that just the voice of an embittered would-be scientist or a legitimate criticism of those who are incapable of thinking outside the box? Does it even matter? The important thing is that user experience has endorsed this alternative approach even if the mainstream medical community has not. So while the medical community lags behind and either ignores the issue altogether or tentatively asks does magnetic therapy work, the more enlightened and open-minded seeker of answers, instead asks a deeper query of magnetic bracelets – how do they work?

As yet there is no definitive answer, although – needless to say – some theories have been put forward. But of more interest perhaps is the what rather than the why. As in the inquiry that asks what do magnetic bracelets help with? The usual answers are arthritis and headaches. But how much evidence is there to support those claims. Sure we can ask, hopefully, do magnetic bracelets work for arthritis? But as fast as one study says that they do, another study comes along and says actually no, they don’t. Accepting new ideas in medicine is slow. That’s because whenever an innovation comes along, the specter of thalidomide hangs over it.

And of course the same goes for hypertension and its consequences. Do magnetic bracelets work for headaches? There are no medical studies or trials that say they do. But there was a study that said that treatment with pulses from high-power electromagnets could reduce the severity and frequency of migraines. So at least when some one asks do magnets really help with pain, we can answer in the affirmative – albeit to a limited degree. Then maybe the same question could be asked of arthritis. Do magnets work for arthritis, even if not of the kind you wear on your wrist?

Alas no similar study had been undertaken for the use of such high power magnets on arthritis patients as in the migraine study. So there is no data one way or the other on that one. On the other hand, there was a study in 2004 by Tim Harlow of the Peninsula Medical School that concluded that magnetic bracelets ‘ease aches’ in osteoarthritis sufferers specifically. So magnetic bracelets DO work, say researchers, albeit in the case of one particular ailment.

But what are the benefits of magnetic bracelets to those who suffer from other chronic conditions? Do magnetic bracelets really help with pain in general? Or one type of ailment only?

Of course it is good to be able to cite the recognized positives of such treatment.  There may only be limited things one can say about health benefits of magnetic bracelets – safe alternative medicine, at least even if not yet guaranteed to be effective treatment. But at least we can say, when someone asks “What is a healing bracelet?” that the answer is: whatever works for you.

Paper dealing with Magnetic Therapy

A not that fresh, but quite extensive and deep article about magnetic therapy:

http://healthpsych.psy.vanderbilt.edu/arthritismagnets.htm

An other way to use magnetic field for healing

Maybe not many people heard about it, but there is another, widely used method for healing with magnetic field.

The type of magnets is different though, then used in our jewelry. While our bracelets include permanent  magnets, in the mainstream medicine they are using an electric generated field.

It is called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and can help with bone fractures, even mental disorders (like for example depression) or recovering after stroke.

shutterstock_56191381„It works by using an electromagnet placed on the scalp to generate brief magnetic pulses, about the strength of an MRI scan.

These pulses stimulate the part of the brain called the cerebral cortex.”
/ from here /
Many experiments have confirmed it’s success,  which gives a lot of hope for people struggling with diseases, previously considered as incurable.

„Overall, participants who received the magnet therapy improved by 16.3% immediately following treatment and by 22.6% two weeks later. There were no improvements seen in test scores of those who got the other treatment.“
/from here/

We certainly hope, that it will make even more suffer disappear from this world and help to open up our mind for non-traditional ways of healing too!

What to do with low back pain

Many of magnetic products users suffer from low back pain. Magnetic therapy may help to give relief, but for sure there is additional treatment needed.

The opinion about, which way is the best, varies. Shall people rather stay in bed or still live an active life?

The following article describes very fairly the results of medical researches according the topic. Altough, it says active life does not ensure the better recovery rate, does it not influence psychologicaly?

http://www.spine-health.com/news/20100701/bed-rest-or-staying-active-better-low-back-pain-recovery

How to wear your magnetic bracelet properly?

Many people ask, what is the best way to wear magnetic jewelry. First of all, there is no way at all to wear it wrong. It is no medical device, you can do nothing wrong to your health (just please do not swallow it, to prove “there is a wrong way” :)).

If you dig a little into the theory of magnetic therapy, you will find soon that the main thing is to keep it close to you veins to improve their oxygen carrying capacity of your blood cells.

maglef

According to this theor, you could place magnets on your body, wherever you wish to use their effects. Bracelet is only the simpliest way to do so.

The magnets used in our jewelry are strong enough to work, without touching the skin directly. Therefore, you can leave it a bit loose, just as it is the most comfortable. Simply as that!

To find the right bracelet size, there is some help HERE.

Study Demonstrates the Healing Value of Magnets

As a kid we have a feeling, that our world is safe, everything is settled and finished. We are learning so many things in school that are seem to be never changeable. History, sciences, mathematics.. everything is already invented.
As we grow up borders become more and more soft, and suddenly something completely new breaks into your cognition. This experience makes you rethink the word „certain”. Imagine, you are a doctor learning and practicing since decades. Of course it is not easy to accept changes, and it is also their duty to be skeptical. That might cause that medical science is still not convinced about what to think of magnetic therapy. Time to time new studies are made on both sides.

You can read about test made by the University of Virginia here, and make your own opinion. One thing is for sure, there are no studies stating that magnetic therapy may cause any harm, but tones of people saying the opposite. Maybe it is time to open our mind for those changes?

The researchers first found evidence to support this claim through research with laboratory rats. In their initial study, magnets of 70 milliTesla (mT) field strength—about 10 times the strength of the common refrigerator variety—were placed near the rat’s blood vessels. Quantitative measurements of blood vessel diameter were taken both before and after exposure to the static magnetic fields—the force created by the magnets. Morris and Skalak found that the force had a significant effect: the vessels that had been dilated constricted, and the constricted vessels dilated, implying that the magnetic field could induce vessel relaxation in tissues with constrained blood supply, ultimately increasing blood flow.
/Melissa Maki, University of Virginia/

Slice of the History in pictures

Magnetic Therapy in the 19th century

It is well known that magnetic therapy is not the invention of the 21th century. It was even mentioned in “The Yellow Emperor’s Book of Internal Medicine” written around 2,000 B.C. in China. Now here you can see some interesting pictures from the 19th century. Ads that show how they used magnets, what they used them for and a slight insight in to the “fashion”.

brush

Electromagnetic hairbrush (late 19th century) Claims are for successful treatment of baldness and dandruff as well as headaches.

bigyusz

Electromagnetic (actually magnetic) corsets, braces, insoles and appliances that are a “blessing for delicate women and a boon for weak or nervous men.”

nagybigyó

Wilson’s “magneto-conservative” underwear. Note claims that the entire body can be enclosed and every form of disease is responsive . How comfortable might have that been?

corset

“Wilsonia” magnetic corsets, “physicians recommend” .

If you would like to get some more information about magnets and magnetic therapy, you can find it HERE.

Source: A Historical Perspective of the Popular Use of Electric and Magnetic Therapy /Jeffrey R. Basford, MD, PhD/