Magnetic bracelets versus winter blues… and the winner is…

VENUS' HEARTS Titanium Magnetic Bracelet

VENUS’ HEARTS Titanium Magnetic Bracelet

One of the questions we are often asked is whether magnetic bracelets can be used for psychological therapy, as opposed to its physical counterpart. This is particularly important at this time of year. January is cold and gloomy, its days short and its mood one of utter depression. Unlike December, which offers us Christmas and then the New Year, January offers us nothing by way of good cheer. It is the time when the winter blues really set in.

So if magnetic therapy with an emphasis on psychological benefit is ever needed by the general masses, it is in January.

 MPS™ MEN'S TARENT Stainless Steel & Germanium Magnetic Bracelet


MPS™ MEN’S TARENT Stainless Steel & Germanium Magnetic Bracelet

Unfortunately, there is no scientific evidence that magnetic bracelets can cure depression. But hold your horses there, isn’t that the whole point of psychosomatic action? Whenever magnetic bracelets or other magnetic jewellery appears to work, it is dismissed by the sceptics as the”placebo effect.” In other words, it makes the person feel better psychologically. And in the case of winter depression there is a specific malady known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (or SAD) that is well-known to psychologists and that is crying out for treatment.

 

brs4-2-ta-wmpsAnd how might the placebo effect work with magnetic jewellery against Seasonal Affective Disorder? Well first of all the act of purchasing a magnetic bracelet might itself give a modicum of pleasure. They don’t, after all, call it “retail therapy” for nothing. But aside from that, magnetic jewellery has that very attribute that is the most powerful antidote to the darkness and dreariness of winter: they are bright and shiny – whether made of stainless steel or polished copper.

And they are especially affordable right now, because the January sale is in progress at MPS, with discounts up to 80%. So if now is a time to buy an affordable magnetic bracelets like the ones pictured here and beat those winter blues.

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Let’s use fake pills

One of the most often used argument people use against magnetic therapy is, that the results people report are only caused by their belief in magnetism, not the bracelets itself. The strength of belief is well known, but instead of the “power of our mind” we simply call it Placebo Effect. This name makes it sound a way more scientific, and also more pitiable. We say, “it is only placebo”, as it weren’t one of the most astonishing thing on the world. Also this does not explain how skeptical people might have experienced the effects of magnetic products, but let’s leave it for now.
What is more interesting, it turned out that even doctors who are practicing traditional healing methods are giving placebo medicines to their patients time to time.

“Most family doctors have given a placebo to at least one of their patients,” BBC News reports.

We do not want to judge anyone, probably they have their reasons too. But… When people are going to visit their doctor they trust them completely, and giving fake pills is a lie. IF you choose alternative medication, you know they are not officially accepted yet and there is a chance they are made up. You accept that. Not like when you are attending your family doctor. Although it is for good purpose, helps people to recover many times, but it also does cross some border and shocks the people.
What do you think, is it true that “the end justifies the means”?

You can find the whole article of BBC here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21834440